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Thoughts From Our Virtual Roundtable, 05.01

Thoughts From Our Virtual Roundtable, 05.01

We push pause for one hour each week to talk, share, and listen to 60+ clients and partners who are participating in our Virtual Roundtable. As business leaders, employers, and human beings, this group discusses the impact of the latest COVID-19 developments, and ideas to help each other navigate the changing reality.

These are the topics discussed on May 1st. We hope these can help you and your teams as you make decisions moving ahead.


Roundtable Breakout Group Discussions  

We were able to facilitated short discussion groups with business leaders in our virtual roundtable these past two weeks. The discussions provide a glimpse into the factors shaping how organizations need to redefine themselves ahead. What follows is a summary of the conversations and implications.

Recovery or Redefinition? Or Reimagination?

What comes next is the major question all business leaders are asking. While many are still heavily in impact planning, planning for the future is central to the conversation. The dialogue is about how quick or slow the “recovery” will be, and how organizations can best be prepared for a future post-COVID-19 world.

But it’s difficult to even think of what comes next as a “recovery” – the changes are so rapid and unstable that uncertainty reigns; the process to reopen the economy and reintroduce physical interaction will come in phases; the dynamics vary dramatically by sector, region, and even community; and there will be no return to “normal” as we knew it.

The driving reality right now is uncertainty – multiple models, lots and lots of data from varied sources, and endless scenarios.  No one knows the answers. Yet, decisions have to be made.

Two business leaders shared:

“There is so much fear of what to do and what not to do. We are in a frozen moment that keeps getting longer.”

“It is about managing new challenges. We have to think about those now, but we will go backward before we go forwards again.”

What the data show this week may not carry over to next week. The context in which planning decisions must be made is anything but certain as government leaders in every state and community contemplate the smartest and safest way to remove the lockdown, some more quickly than others. It is a phased process. Back steps will hinder the ability to build or re-establish trust, but there is an acceptance that it will happen as the pandemic ebbs and flows.  This will vary by industry and geography. Business leaders need to focus at the category level and not get too comfortable as things will shift.

We will not recover to where we were, rather, we will redefine or reimagine the path toward where we are headed.

Time to reset and reflect on important decisions that should already have been made.

COVID-19 is accelerating trends that had already been in motion but had not reached a high level of urgency for many. Now is the time to make decisions that should have been made before. The decision to be nimbler, more adaptable. The decision to be more focused. The decision to be more relevant.

It is about hitting the reset button. Hold to the things that make you special and consider how they translate to a reimagined societal context.

Internally evaluate the essentials of the brand and offering core to the business and how to continue to deliver. Identify the “fat” not needed to efficiently deliver. A crisis of this magnitude is very effective at revealing underlying problems in your approach, operations, structure, culture, offering/service, or even business model.

Ask the questions of what should be dropped or what changes or tough decisions need to be made and not put off any longer. Technology will be a big part of this exercise. Pay attention to the shifts. There is no business practice safe from this evaluation – everything is on the table.

New paradigms are emerging to frame how people make decisions.

The changing dynamics most important to prepare for what’s to come are those shaping the human reality in society. Ultimately, much of the framework for how humans are processing decisions has been completely flipped on its head. And it’s not done changing yet. The risk versus reward calculus for what were routine choices is anything but routine or automatic today.

Observing and understanding how the forces setting up a new paradigm of choice for your customers, your employees, your investors, and even your leadership matters now more than ever. Therein lies the answer to what is needed and the role your solution should play moving forward. Businesses need to be preparing for a period of redefinition or reimagination of their role, rather than contemplating how to operate in a period of recovery.

In these limited breakout discussion groups over the last two weeks our roundtable participants identified some shifting dynamics to pay attention to in defining a future role. Many revolve around the expectations of what life will be like as we attempt to map physical distancing into our mainstream lives outside of the sheltering in place mandate.

Here are some of the topics raised and trends discussed:

Public Transportation
  • Mass transit won’t completely recover as habits/attitudes (fear of disease in general) are likely to permanently change.
  • Will riders feel safe? What standards are needed for hourly/daily cleaning?  Who will return to ridership, who will seek other means of transit?
Retail
  • Retail consumers are eager to return to shopping and may even be out ahead of business being prepared to be open.
  • There is concern about having to back track and re-close if something goes wrong on re-opening. This brings a desire to ‘get it right’ and not erode consumer trust.
Gyms
  • Wearing face masks, extra time spent cleaning equipment, wait times to use machines along with adopting home workout and virtual could mean many won’t go back to the gyms, at least not like they did pre-COVID.
  • How will the gym experience be re-imagined?
Disparity of Impact
  • So many households are just trying to exist with a sudden loss of income.
  • This could lead quickly to a very real discussion of minimum basic income.
  • Class differences will accelerate the widening of a division that already existed.
Work and Work Environment
  • Many will now prefer working from home.
  • Office space changes such as working in shifts, physical distancing, face masks and other post-COVID adaptions may erode the value of the office.
  • This could lead to many no longer needing their office space – what does a “corporate headquarters” look like tomorrow? What type of physical presence is needed?
  • Business meeting attendance will take a while to recover because businesses will not likely invest in having employees travel.
De-urbanization
  • With the ability to work remotely, more and more people are going to be fleeing the cities away from places where is it less safe and into places where is it less expensive and away from the crowds.
  • How long lasting will this trend be?
Entertainment
  • Will people ever get comfortable with going to confined places (such as Great Wolf Lodge with large indoor pools, indoor concerts, etc.)?
Education
  • There has not been much talk about returning to school – when it actually comes, what will be the impact? What are we doing to reimagine the school experience?
  • Lots of people won’t be able to go back to work if their kids can’t go back to school.
  • Could the delivery of education change that requires less of a physical buildings footprint with shared campuses, rotating in-person schedules, etc.
  • Other options—1 in 10 parents are now considering home schooling.
  • There is a real disparity in access to broadband connectivity for online education – is 5G a solution ahead?
  • The “Zoom boom” reality has completely shifted expectations and potential of how education can be provided.
Animal Health and Dairy/Meat Sectors
  • Virtual visits with veterinarians have increased.
  • Some vets have used curb side drop off to keep in-person appointments but there is a huge concern that smaller family run veterinarians will close up shop and there will be fewer business owners in the sector, changing the ecosystem.
  • In the feed animal business, the change from bottling in small school size milk cartons to larger retail size containers is not an easy change and for some plants it’s just not possible, so there is dumping happening.
  • The recent news of meat packaging plants having to close also puts a major strain on the supply chain and creating challenges for farmers.
Science and Facts
  • Science means you might get a lot wrong as you are on a search to prove or disprove things. But, is science instead being conflated to be ‘evidence’ for a belief of POV?
  • People are looking for sources they trust and familiar voices. There is a human aspect to this we can’t ignore. We want to connect with the media and information sources we know.
  • There is danger in relying too much on facts and missing the narrative, the proliferation of facts and opinions brings its own fatigue if all we do is relay facts

As these, and many other, dynamics unfold they are creating expectations that will frame how consumers make decisions when weighing risks and rewards for different behaviors. It is critical to communicate early and with transparency about what to expect, what they will see, do, and experience as they return to previously “locked down” options.

Trust and the role of corporate America.

Trust matters in a crisis. But options are limited, and scrutiny is high. People are building their own networks to find information they can trust. Our current reality has revealed a scenario absent of experts – lot of questions without answers and a lot of guessing.

Business leaders can and should take action, and many already have. For example, there is a lack of standards and consistency on what ‘distancing’ means in a re-opened market and how to keep spaces as safe and healthy as possible for consumers and employees. This impedes the speed of recovery. But it also means business is stepping up to create standards, to ensure consistency.

Business leaders are reaching out across industries to come up with ideas and plans, getting key players together to solve problems and find ways to work together for the common good. But part of the challenge is coming together physically, so people are left trying to figure out how to do it.

A key question is what happens in a democratic republic and a free-market economy when people can’t “meet” with their leaders. If leaders and institutions operate more within their bubble it could result in questions about who to believe and who is in control. People will seek centers of control OR begin to assert their own control, resulting in new frameworks around politics, faith, etc.

Businesses can shape how this future unfolds in a way that government is currently struggling to do so given the partisan divide, rancor, and lack of collaboration we see today. Business leaders can ask in what way has your/will your company provide local support in a way that mattered and that builds trust and confidence?  How do you create an authentic local connection with your brand and employees during this time of crisis, and how does this reinforce you core values and purpose?  If you do not do this, you will have missed an opportunity to make a difference.

Rishad Tobaccowalla offers a fantastic framework for approaching future planning right now in his recent blog post: https://rishadt.wordpress.com/2020/04/25/the-great-re-invention-resurrect-now/


Peering Into the Gloom: Some Ideas to Help the Process 

Heart+Mind shared a few thoughts about the approach we are taking to understand what is happening and where things are headed as part of business planning.

First, the obvious two most important indicators of revenue are sales and pipeline. Consistently look at what clients, customers, partners, and even competitors are experiencing.

Second, what do we know?

  • We are already in a recession.
  • Some sectors are worse off than others and the recovery will vary by sector.
  • The stock market has historically been a good indicator of recovery:
    1. On average, it rebounds four months before a recovery beings
    2. The market bottomed out on March 23
    3. We saw the strongest 15-day rebound EVER – up 27.2%
    4. We’ll likely need some “good news” to keep things going
  • Lots of models are out there… prediction vary and are changing:
    1. Looking at five or six well accepted models can give us a sense of what might happen.
    2. Are there some directional conclusions upon which they agree?
    3. As a group, how are they changing? Are they getting more pessimistic or more optimistic?
  • The shape of the recovery will matter – U, V, W, etc.

Third, what should we be watching closely?

  • What are we seeing in states and countries that have already loosened restrictions?
    1. Infection, hospitalizations and deaths
    2. Will restrictions be reinstated?
  • Health Developments
    1. Vaccine timing – 12+ months out?
    2. Other treatments (Remdesivir, etc.)
    3. Management efforts – testing, contact tracing and protecting vulnerable
  • Industry/Employer Health
    1. Unemployment (by sector)
    2. Consumer income
    3. Normalization of mass transportation
    4. Shipping activity
    5. Airport departures / TSA figures
  • Government Financial Support
  • Consumer Behavior
    1. Consumer spending
    2. Consumer sentiment; confidence, diminishment of fear, greater sense of security, etc.
  • Stock Market

Articles

Finally, we found the following 21 articles we feel you are likely to find useful and helpful in the different perspectives they offer with respect to how to be planning for the future.

  1. Focuses in on the biggest indicator of economic recovery being the control of the virus itself, and claims the recession is going to be much longer than many economists anticipate
    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/4/9/21212743/coronavirus-economic-crash-2020-recovery-stock-market-covid-19
  2. Provides analysis on the different shapes that economic recovery may take and what factors each shape depend on
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/02/economy/recession-how-long-will-it-be/index.html
  3. Focuses on the shapes of the recovery, and what it will take to come out of the recession, including exuberant consumer spending, employment rates, etc.
    https://www.inquirer.com/economy/what-post-coronavirus-economic-recovery-v-shape-joel-naroff-20200412.html
  4. Discusses how each economic forecast model leverages health response on one axis, against the effectiveness of economic response on the other, but that each model is ultimately wrong as it uses the GDP as the yardstick of the return to normal.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/nishandegnarain/2020/04/22/not-back-but-forward-what-the-post-covid-19-economic-recovery-models-are-getting-wrong/#60dea3a47abb
  5. A look at the staggering economic outlook, leveraging such indicators as manufacturing, corporate earnings, stock idexes, etc.
    https://www.usnews.com/news/economy/articles/2020-04-27/earnings-data-reports-this-week-to-reveal-mounting-economic-tolls-of-coronavirus
  6. Focuses in on various economic trajectories, while look at household wealth as a key indicator of a bounceback
    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/4/19/21227061/steve-mnuchin-economy-recession-growth
  7. Conjectures that there is no reliable portrait of the future economic outlook, but looking at the return of activity through the lens of energy use, pollution and subway rides, to name a few, are helpful indicators
    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/22/a-u-a-v-or-maybe-a-nike-swoosh-economists-try-to-predict-what-a-recovery-will-look-like.html
  8. Zeroes in on one of the most powerful indicators of economic activity, airline travel, as a way to measure a rebound in America
    https://www.lawfareblog.com/international-air-travel-indicator-covid-19-economic-recovery
  9. The reality that of how influential the IHME model is but how much it can contradict other models, leading to the need to triangulate several different models to predict the future, which many states and national government officials are doing
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2020/04/06/americas-most-influential-coronavirus-model-just-revised-its-estimates-downward-not-every-model-agrees/
  10. Many businesses are leveraging GIS-powered systems to incorporate data from multiple sources to drive decision-making and behaviors
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/esri/2020/04/10/business-resiliency-in-the-time-of-coronavirus-part-2/#589042541f86
  11. Global stock market can be the best indicator of truth, especially in a time when we are awash in data from multiple—often times, competing—sources.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/richkarlgaard/2020/03/29/economic-forecasting-in-the-age-of-coronavirus—3-tips/#272db5ee6e78
  12. The article discusses how rolling forecasts should incorporate both macroeconomic and company-specific data to identify major areas of EBITDA risk. The forecasts should also identify second-order impacts, such as geographical supply-chain disruption and employee dislocation, as well as likely sources of cash leakages and customer-liquidity projections.
    https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/the-cfos-role-in-helping-companies-navigate-the-coronavirus-crisis
  13. The economic reality and resuming to normal will be extremely variant industry to industry, which means returning to work for many will be gradual and likely messy.
    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/09/how-businesses-are-planning-to-bring-workers-back-after-coronavirus.html
  14. Claims that the months ahead will be quite volatile and dynamic, and believe that leaders should pay close attention to the efficacy of the health system surge, the scaling of traditional public-health approaches, the development of antibody testing, the nature of immunity, and innovation.
    https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/risk/our-insights/covid-19-implications-for-business
  15. Focuses on the butterfly effect of the coronavirus, with aftershocks that will permanently reshape our world as we remain in a long emergency that will usher in realities like rising nationalism and a migrant crisis
    https://www.fastcompany.com/90488665/the-coronavirus-butterfly-effect-six-predictions-for-a-new-world-order
  16. With working from home the new–and perhaps permanent– normal, we will see a shift to trust-based work cultures, shifts to increased customer inclusivity, and creative collaboration tactics
    https://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/how-the-coronavirus-is-already-rewriting-the-future-of-business
  17. Outline many big ideas we’re beginning to see emerge at both macro-shift levels, e.g. rise of new federalism and at the trend level, e.g. rise of telemedicine
    https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/03/19/coronavirus-effect-economy-life-society-analysis-covid-135579
  18. A focus on the emergence of an internet-based society, smart-city infrastructure, a shift to cleaner transport, etc.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/miriamtuerk/2020/04/08/coronavirus-will-permanently-affect-how-cities-work/#50fda8081da9
  19. Discusses the permanent changes that have occurred in the workplace and will stick, including working remotely, doing virtual client sessions, with traditional office setups fading into a relic of the past and leaders letting go an illusion of control.
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/coronavirus-will-permanently-change-how-we-work-11584380290
  20. The impact of isolation on single individuals creates grim outlooks and a change on how they meet people and engage once the new normal resumes
    https://time.com/5819187/dating-coronavirus/
  21. Focuses on how the virus will radically change the trajectory of history and the world as we know it, perhaps ushering in necessary changes like an improved, more fortified healthcare system, new political systems, etc.
    https://www.latimes.com/politics/story/2020-04-06/coronavirus-crisis-historic-event-change-america

SURVEY DATA

Please reference the additional documents provided for our weekly tracking data findings and slides that we have shared.

Also, please go to https://heartandmindstrategies.com/covid-19/ to access any of this information at any time. Please feel free to share and use however is most helpful for you.

COVID-19 Understanding the Human Story: Storylines From Our National Tracking Survey, Week 7

Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions April 29-30, 2020 via an online survey.

Access the full report here: Download PDF. Please contact us if you would like access to the crosstabs.


NOTE: Findings based on preliminary data.

To Re-Open or Not

Groups that still favor balancing the economy and health over a strict public health focus include Republicans, Households earning $100K+, those with a child at home, and states with fewer than 10,000 cases.

While more Americans believe it is time to start removing stay-at-home restrictions and the time to reopen is coming sooner than later, there is some uncertainty.


Trust builds in State and Local Leaders

We see a “general” acceptance of the actions of Governors this week on shutdown/reopening. State governments saw a bump and are once again the most trusted level of government (+4). City governments are also slightly more trusted this week (+2).


Real Threat but Less Worry

The number of Americans believing the coronavirus is a real threat instead of overblown is holding steady with over three-quarters believing the threat is real many weeks into the crisis, but fear and worry are now at lowest levels.


Most Expect Drop in Activities while some are Engaging in Social Outings

One-quarter of Americans (26%) are meeting friends or family with a mask on or keep distance between themselves. Generation Z is far more likely than other age cohorts to be engaging in these types of social visits (37%)

  • One-quarter of Americans are going out in public without a mask (23%).
  • Personal and beauty services are still being utilized – 10% of Americans got a massage last week and 6% have gotten a beauty treatment.
  • Almost one-in-ten met up with someone not living in their household to exercise.

Hopeful Anticipation of Shorter Impact

Americans are slightly more optimistic on the length of the crisis in economic terms this week with a drop in the number of people who think the economic impacts will be felt for seven months or more.

Which might be because a growing number of Americans believe the economy is improving.


Concern for Others Grows

Many say they have a greater underlying concern for others and tolerance as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This week, there were shifts in many key values away from “negative impact” to “no change” underscoring last week as a peak of negative emotions.


Decline in Connecting with Others

Americans are feeling more hopeful and determined, but doing less connecting with neighbors, family and friends.


Data Source: Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions 4/29-30/2020 via an online survey. Access the full report here: Download PDF.  

Sample: n=1,004 US Adults 18+

Topics: We explored attitudes, feelings, and actions with respect to the COVID-19 crisis. This provides a quick look at the key storylines we uncovered by quickly digging into the data set.

COVID-19 Understanding the Human Story: Storylines From Our National Tracking Survey, Week 6

Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions April 22-23, 2020 via an online survey.

Access the full report here: Download PDF. Please contact us if you would like access to the crosstabs.


NOTE: Findings based on preliminary data.

Reality of Longer Economic Impact

Building on a large increase last week, this week the number of Americans who believe the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak will last longer than one year has ticked up again.


More Focus on Balancing Economic Concerns

For the first time, the number of Americans saying we need to balance economic concerns with public health is higher than the number believing public health should be our sole focus right now.


Questioning if we are Ready to Reopen

For the first time, we measured the number of Americans who believe stay-at home and similar government orders should be relaxed. Majority of Americans are not ready to reopen. Two-in-five Americans believe it is time to relax orders keeping businesses closed and Americans at home.

  • These figures are higher among those who have been laid off (56%)
  • Republicans (52%), and those in urban locations (46%)

Decisions on this timing of “re-opening” is shifting Americans away from the solidarity we have seen in past weeks. The debate marked a significant shift in people seeing division as a result of the pandemic, the first such movement yet.

Partisan and life stage realities are driving very different perspectives on what we should do next to reach the balance needed.


Negative Emotions are Declining

Most negative emotions dipped this week.


Impact on Relationships

But for the first time we saw an increase (+5 pts) in the number of Americans who are expecting a negative impact from COVID-19 on their family relationships (spouse and children).


Impact on Human Values

In a new tracking measure, we see Freedom, Security, Peace of Mind, Social Order, Enjoyment, Happiness and Well Being are the values most negatively impacted for Americans in this pandemic. On a positive note, we see the value of Concern for Others improving.

  • Boomers are more likely to have seen negative impacts on these dimensions.
  • There are minimal differences by political party.


Changing Routines

Nearly three quarters (71%) of Americans are expecting permanent changes in some of their routines when this is over. These are most likely to happen in eating, entertainment, downtime, exercise, and connections.


Eroding Trust

State governments enjoyed two weeks of built trust. However, as all are contemplating what to do next, we measured a big drop in trust – both state and local government trust levels are the lowest measured. Trust in the federal government dropped yet again to where only a little more than 1 in 4 say they trust what they hear from DC.

The scientific and medical communities have taken the greatest hit in recent weeks – we’ve seen a 10-point drop in the trust for the CDC and a 17-point drop for the WHO, all in just one month.


Is Corporate America the Unifier?

Corporate America received higher marks in its response this past week – will the private sector be the leader to help us unify? This could be a reality as we see business leaders inform and even make their own best decisions about re-opening, irrespective of government action.

 


Data Source: Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions 4/22-23/2020 via an online survey. Access the full report here: Download PDF.  

Sample: n=1,000 US Adults 18+

Topics: We explored attitudes, feelings, and actions with respect to the COVID-19 crisis. This provides a quick look at the key storylines we uncovered by quickly digging into the data set.

Thoughts From Our Virtual Roundtable, 04.17

We push pause for one hour each week to talk, share, and listen to 60+ clients and partners who are participating in our Virtual Roundtable. As business leaders, employers, and human beings, this group discusses the impact of the latest COVID-19 developments, and ideas to help each other navigate the changing reality.

These are the topics discussed on April 17th. We hope these can help you and your teams as you make decisions moving ahead.


WPI Share on Chinese Brand Actions

Worldwide Partners (WPI) provided a POV on what’s happening in China, and observations and insights that can potentially offer a compass for nations in the West on what we might anticipate for business.

  • Employees in China who are now coming back to work have a primary concern about health and hygiene. They’re not so much worried about their jobs as they are worried about protecting themselves and their environment.
  • Consumer behavior in China has changed beyond recognition. Campaigns being worked on 2-3 months ago are not relevant at all in today’s environment.
  • Businesses have begun to open again in China, but with restrictions. They’re anticipating a prolonged contraction; anticipating waves.
  • Patterns of consumption have changed dramatically, and many brands are trying to capitalize through livestreaming, conducting offline events in an online environment, pivoting products and services to in-home experiences, and using social tools differently.

Four Themes That Have Emerged Out of China So Far

  1. Accelerated digital migration: China is primarily mobile and cashless, and the trends that they were seeing in China have accelerated drastically.
    • Home delivery including groceries, has grown across all ages and become the default.
    • The purchase journey is moving from product-centric to people-centric; people are turning to self-discovery or referrals from friends more.
    • Livestreaming has taken on a dominate place for brands in China; productivity apps are moving to the #1 or #2 spot in app stores.
    • Product launches online utilizing influencers and online Q&As.
    • Real estate seeing high growth using VR.
  2. Self-sufficiency at-home: Consumers are taking the opportunity to take better care of themselves because they don’t have access to products and services that they did in retail.
    • People are using this time to learn new things – a hotel property in China is doing online cooking classes.
    • Restaurants in China are promoting DIY meals and delivering fresh food.
  3. Health consciousness: People are taking the time to focus on staying healthy and replicating what they can do at the gym at home.
    • Health and fitness apps are being downloaded at huge levels.
    • People are shifting from “medicine” to “health;” “treatment” to “sustainability”.
    • Hotels are pushing workouts from their hotel staff; Vogue pushing out spa tips from influencers.
  4. Retail getting creative: Because their “normal” environments are essentially shutdown.
    • Shopping malls are creating the opportunity to pre-book times for when to try on clothes, and they will ensure that the clothes you want to try on are properly cleaned.
    • Retailers are leveraging their staff as influencers. Trying to create that connection in an online environment where previously you may have interacted with a staff member on a frequent basis when going to a physical space.

We need to take things to the next level, beyond empathetic and add value, to be utilitarian as well as empathetic.


Strada Education Network Tracking Data Share

Strada Education Network shared some of the tracking data on the impact of the virus on jobs and skills training required for those losing their jobs now and those likely to change fields entirely.

 

Training will be required to obtain new work. And most who seek such training are planning to look for employment in a different field.

Online solutions will be key in meeting this need that is bringing a fundamental shift in behavior and expectations for such content and programs.


Employer Role in Employee Mental Health Management

Example from Heart+Mind Strategies

At Heart+Mind as this pandemic emerged our sole focus was on protecting physical health. But, with shelter-in-place, struggling economy, sickness, death and job insecurity as our new normal, we’ve turned our focus to the mental health and well-being of our employees.

The specific actions we are taking right now include:

  • Regular check-ins with our employees regarding their and their loved ones physical and mental well-being
  • Initiated financial and personal transparency
  • Frequent communications
    • Approached with empathy
    • Focused on “knowns” in order to help employees feel some control
    • Always open and honest, therefore accepting sometimes we get it right and sometimes we get it wrong and that’s okay
  • All-hands video calls where leadership speaks directly and openly to every employee about current and potential impact to our business
    • Allow for any and all questions and pledge to answer them in a clear and satisfying manner
    • Get used to sharing things that are uncomfortable, balancing necessary vs. unnecessary worry, what is really KNOWN vs. forecasted/hypothesized
  • “In Our Hearts and On Our Minds” twice weekly emails from our President, Mark Wirthlin.
    • On our minds: components of the CARES Act
    • In our hearts: flexibility, self-compassion, appreciation
  • Established team channels for employees who have children at home
    • Share parenting and educational resources for kids
    • Commiserate and cheer each other on
  • Wellness Wednesdays with revolving topics from identifying stressors, to self-care, to remote working
  • Turning to our benefits providers for COVID-19 offerings
    • Tangible resources to proactively and reactively manage emotional responses to the “new normal”
  • Extensions of EAP programs

Example from Kum&Go

Leadership at Kum&Go (https://www.kumandgo.com/) have been so concentrated on trying to keep the wheels on the bus that the emotional/mental health of their associates is something they have not concentrated on as much. The way they have approached it is as follows:

  • A re-emphasis on their employee assistance program and other resources associated with their benefits offerings. However, many of their associates choose to not take on the benefits programs from them.
  • Because of this, Kum&Go has decided to really focus on their physical and their financial well-being.
    • They try to stay on top of the ever-changing CDC guidelines to ensure their stores are safe.
    • Financially they communicated that they will have no layoffs and no furloughs, and will be increasing everyone’s pay by $2 an hour.
    • Ultimately, they have indirectly addressed their associates’ well-being.

Some thoughts from others shared during discussion:

  • Start every communication by acknowledging all of the issues (not just financial).
  • Starting mindfulness practices by tapping into different employees who practice yoga or know breathing techniques and utilizing Teams/Zoom so everyone can be together.

 


Priority Questions Ahead

We again asked for priority questions to focus on in the coming week. We use this input to guide us as we are gathering information to share in the next Virtual Roundtable. Please reach out if you have additional information and/or requests.

Several offered some additional questions of interest:

  • Which of the cultural changes we are seeing are temporary while restrictions are in place and which will become permanent?
  • The handling of PPP and SBA loans has been abysmal–most small businesses are still struggling for any help. What impact is this having on expectations?
  • States as brands: how governors are shaping future perceptions of the states by how they handle the crisis and restart.
  • The President is directly combatting the role of the governors and creating turmoil that will continue to spread the virus. How can brands deal with this?
  • What are your plans for bringing employees back to work? Not so much timing, but process.
  • As the mental health and economic pressures grow, we may start to see more protests and pressure for opening. How do we balance those pressures with public health?
  • How to gain certainty from the health community so that we can let state, local, and business innovate and open up again?

SURVEY DATA

Please reference the additional documents provided for our weekly tracking data findings and slides that we have shared.

Also, please go to https://heartandmindstrategies.com/covid-19/ to access any of this information at any time. Please feel free to share and use however is most helpful for you.

COVID-19 Understanding the Human Story: Storylines From Our National Tracking Survey, Week 5

Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions April 15-16, 2020 via an online survey.

Access the full report here: Download PDF. Please contact us if you would like access to the crosstabs.


NOTE: Findings based on preliminary data.

Public Health vs. Economy

The country is nearly evenly split on whether we should continue the social distancing lockdown at all costs vs. open to address the economy.  This is how the sentiment falls out by region:

  • Mountain states, less impacted by the crisis, are much more likely to favor opening up.
  • East South Central states lean toward balancing action to help the economy.
  • The center of the country is evenly split, but leaning toward protecting public health.
  • The Northeast and West Coast are solidly in the “do all it takes to stop the virus” camp.

Hopeful Optimists and Concerned Realists are squarely on the side of taking a more balanced approach, while the Anxious Worriers are solidly in the lockdown camp.


Emotions Vary

Our three audiences based upon emotional response remain steady – largest are the Concerned Realists (half) and the Anxious Worriers (a third).  Hopeful Optimists (a fifth) cover the rest of Americans.

Regionally in the US, there is a noticeable difference in attitudes on the two coasts vs. the heartland, south, and mountain states in the country.

  • Realism is highest in the central states.
  • Optimism is highest in the mountain and southern states.
  • Anxiety is highest in the northeast and the two coasts.


Spirit of Solidarity

The American spirit of solidarity appears to be strong as most in every region see us growing closer together. The Central and Mountain states are seeing the greatest feeling of unity through the crisis.


Increased Anxiety and Mental Health Concerns

While last week seemed to be the beginning of people turning toward the early stages of recovery mode, reality seemed to settle in this week. Most emotions stayed they same, but the stress of lockdown is evident.

  • The number believing this is a real threat peaked two weeks ago, now continues to decline.
  • After a few weeks of more positive expectations, mental health concerns again spiked.
  • Anxiety is the one negative emotion that jumped 5 points this week.

 

 


Evolving Expectations

The reality check this week slowed expectations for upcoming personal travel and church services, but even more expect to eat out and socialize more in the next two weeks.

Millennials continue to be the group most likely to say they will engage in these behaviors in the next two weeks (Dine out 32%, Socialize in a group of 10+ 26%). They are also significantly more likely to be planning to work out at the gym (27% vs. 16% Total) and plan to travel for personal reasons (28% vs. 18% Total)

We tracked the biggest jump in expected spending for apparel and technology within the next two weeks.

In terms of spending, Americans did more online shopping for other goods (not food/household goods) this past week.


Trust in Government

Trust in the federal government remains at the lowest as most say what they heard from DC left them even more confused. As governors become more vocal and at the center of decisions around next steps, trust in state government has improved a bit.


Trust in Employers

In the past week trust in employers has improved. Our analysis of 5 combined waves of data shows different employee mindsets across industries:

  • Employees in tech, insurance, education, and telecom seem to be in the strongest position.
  • Those taking a heavy toll are in the weakest position: retail, government, food and beverages, restaurants, travel, and leisure.
  • Employees in auto, transport, and manufacturing are optimistic but do not have as much trust in their employer.
  • Employees in healthcare, consulting, financial services, and construction trust their employers but are more likely to be anxious and worried.


Data Source: Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions 4/15-16/2020 via an online survey. Access the full report here: Download PDF.  

Sample: n=1,016 US Adults 18+

Topics: We explored attitudes, feelings, and actions with respect to the COVID-19 crisis. This provides a quick look at the key storylines we uncovered by quickly digging into the data set.

Thoughts From Our Virtual Roundtable, 04.13

We push pause for one hour each week to talk, share, and listen to 60+ clients and partners who are participating in our Virtual Roundtable. As business leaders, employers, and human beings, this group discusses the impact of the latest COVID-19 developments, and ideas to help each other navigate the changing reality.

These are the topics discussed on April 13th. We hope these can help you and your teams as you make decisions moving ahead.


Other Online Meeting And Connection Solutions

Last week we had several people ask about alternatives to Zoom for online meetings and video calls. While many of us are leveraging Zoom regularly, there have been various reports about privacy and security concerns. At Heart+Mind we use MS Teams, Zoom, and Miro (virtual whiteboarding tool) for our meetings and synthesis sessions – they have been very effective.

However, we did some digging around and we found the following additional info for you. We hope this helps if you’re looking around for other tools.

If you have never used Miro, we recommend checking it out as a simple and compelling solution for getting a team together in a “virtual room” with a white board and stickies and markers. It has video conferencing built in, and they’ve created many templates for almost any type of meeting or planning session you can imagine. We highly recommend it.


Brand Engagement and Post-Virus Spend Expectations

We added a few questions to our tracking survey this week about how consumers are feeling about interaction with brands and spend in categories moving ahead. It’s always difficult for people to give a direct read to questions such as these, but it will be helpful to see how things shift as the pandemic and recovery unfold.

First, there’s an opportunity for brands in specific categories to engage more with consumers related to product/service changes that brands are experiencing because of the crisis.

Not surprisingly, small business owners and those with a negative job impact past month have a heightened need to want to hear more from banking, mortgage, investment services and financial planners.

When it comes to planning for where one might spend more post-crisis, aside from the obvious (e.g. restaurants), cooking from home may be a longer-term game plan (likely for both financial necessity but also for enjoyment/adapted life changes) as there’s a noted increase in future spending on groceries post-crisis.

  • The future spend increase on groceries is most acute among:
    • those younger (<45)
    • those with kids at home and
    • urban dwellers.
    • There is no income difference; however, those who have experienced a negative job impact are significantly more likely to note this spend will increase once the crisis passes – as do those who work full-time.
  • Telecom and digital subscriptions are the areas where a net negative is noticed, meaning there’s a likelihood to spend less on these services after the crisis passes

Below we plot the net scores for both a desire to for more/less brand engagement AND intent to spend more/less in the future by category.


Faith and Hope and Church – Holy Week Observations

Given the focus on religious observance over this past holiday weekend, we want to share a few of the insights we have related to faith and spirituality during this crisis situation. Several of you have asked about any observations we have in this territory.

First, we find a major factor driving “hope” across the country is people’s faith. We have already noted that a third (32%) of the country remains “hopeful” in the current pandemic. As we have dug a little more deeply into this feeling we find hope is mostly driven by faith (46%), approach to life (43%), and a desire to make things better for those around us (36%). Some (36%) are hopeful this crisis will bring about needed changes in the country.

The faith factor is holding steady as the primary driver of a “hopeful” attitude in the country. But this varies with intensity across different cohorts. When looking at the 32% who say they are “hopeful” we find these varying levels explaining faith as the primary reason for their hope:

  • African Americans (68%)
  • Under $50K household income (56%)
  • Urban (50%) and Rural (53%) areas
  • High school graduate or some college (51%)
  • Employed (50%)

Second, church attendance has dropped significantly as services have been cancelled. In this first week of tracking 71% of US households who typically attend church said they had cancelled or changed weekly worship services by mid-March. However, in the last two weeks we have seen regular increases in the number of Americans who believe they are very/extremely likely to attend church in the next two weeks.

  • March 26 – 10%
  • April 2 – 15%
  • April 9 – 21%

Going into Easter Weekend, we see the following cohorts are most likely to expect to return to worship services within the next two weeks. These are large numbers given the lockdown status.

  • Conservative Democrats (38%)
  • Business Travelers (38%)
  • Small Business Owners (34%)
  • $100K+ (31%)
  • Millennials (30%)
  • Mountain States (30%)
  • Expect Economic Impact Less than 7 Months (30%)
  • Kids at Home (29%)
  • African Americans (28%)
  • Mid-Atlantic States (28%)
  • Urban Areas (28%)
  • Hispanic (26%)
  • Republicans (26%)
  • Working (25%)
  • Gen X (25%)

Talent Recruitment and Retention – Your Thinking

In our recent session we discussed some of the trends and shifts that may represent potential implications for talent retention and recruitment post COVID-19. After discussion, we asked you to vote on those trends you believe we need to be most prepared to address. Most of us are seeing the likely shift to more remote work long after this crisis – but there are several in here that also suggest a general increase in attention paid to employees and work-life balance.

1. Remote work may be more frequent or even permanent (66%)
2. Nurturing a culture that is more physically dispersed (33%)
3. Paradigm shift in how we work and the accelerated digital transformation (30%)
4. Disintegration of the M-5, 8-5 work week (30%)
5. Increasing importance of employee health & well being (27%)
6. Are employees going to feel more ‘disposable’ now than ever before? (27%)
7. Different ways to measure productivity (24%)
8. Company actions and citizenship during COVID more scrutinized by current and future talent (21%)
9. Greater use of technology for how we learn/reskill talent (21%)
10. Increased importance of balance between human and economic value of work (18%)
11. Potential employee exodus, re-evaluation of goals, needs, interests (18%)
12. Remote interviewing, selection, onboarding, training, virtual career fairs here to stay (15%)
13. Reduction in office leasing (15%)
14. Potential lack of trust based on a company’s recent layoff activity (15%)
15. Less global migration, potential shift away from larger urban centers (12%)
16. Employees working multiple job to triangulate income/sense of security (12%)
17. Accelerated agile use of freelance, partners, gig economy talent (9%)
18. A more ageist workforce (9%)
19. Employee desperation to return to the workforce (9%)
20. Priority of skill based hiring (6%)
21. Increased use of AI / Automation in recruiting and identifying candidate skill match (6%)
22. College recruiting in a virtual world (6%)
23. Greater interest in industries that are deemed essential businesses (6%)
24. Shift from strictly professional relationships to more social relationships with colleagues. (6%)
25. Larger talent pool (3%)

How will you prepare now in how you present yourself to staff – current and prospective in the future? What actions taken now put you in a better position to address these shifting dynamics when full recovery kicks in over time?


Priority Questions Ahead

We again asked for priority questions to focus on in the coming week. We use this input to guide us as we are gathering information to share in the next Virtual Roundtable. Please reach out if you have additional information and/or requests.

Our latest prioritized list of your high need questions is as follows:

  1. Signals to watch now to get understanding of post COVID-19 consumer behavior
  2. Timing and steps to shift from impact to recovery
  3. Long-term business planning
  4. Appropriate comms and interactions with customers during COVID-19 and as we shift to the new normal
  5. Technology support expectations of employees (teleworking)
  6. Post COVID-19 views for us to consider now
  7. What are new and different ways to make connections with clients virtually (beyond Zoom/Facetime)
  8. Employer role in managing mental health
  9. Productivity expectations during this remote working experience
  10. Roles & expectations of non-profit sector
  11. What will the new normal be in terms of the job market
  12. Infrastructure and operational investment to plan for future
  13. Engaging with employees now vs post stay-at-home
  14. Employee expectations in sharing CARES and unemployment benefits

We are continuing to build out ways to look at the tectonic shifts underneath the shifting behaviors that the crisis is forcing but will emerge more long term. This coming Friday we are going to have some specific clients and partners share thoughts about shifting from impact to recovery as many of you are starting to take action in that area.

We will cover as many as we can as we go through these sessions. Please feel free to reach out for things you would like to share. And, please also consider sharing your thinking during the session as topics come up.


SURVEY DATA

Please reference the additional documents provided for our weekly tracking data findings and slides that we have shared.

Also, please go to https://heartandmindstrategies.com/covid-19/ to access any of this information at any time. Please feel free to share and use however is most helpful for you.

COVID-19 Understanding the Human Story: Storylines From Our National Tracking Survey, Week 4

Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions April 8-9, 2020 via an online survey.

Access the full report here: Download PDF. Please contact us if you would like access to the crosstabs.


NOTE: Findings based on preliminary data.

Continue to expect positive outcomes with relationships

Americans seem to have settled into their emotional response and have even started to show early signs of intent to move past isolation. More than a third, now, are choosing to expect positive outcomes for their families, their relationships, and now even their activities.

Generation Z is 9 points more likely to say we are more united, whereas Millennials are less likely to feel more united in this crisis while also expecting COVID-19 to have less negative impact on parts of their life.


Starting to think about out-of-home activities

People are starting to plan out-of-home activities, showing early signs that they might be able to see beyond quarantined life. For the first time in the past month, 1 in 5 say they expect to eat out, socialize, and even travel for personal reasons in the next two weeks.


Reduced negative emotions in contrast to a difficult week

We’ve received the most negative news to date this week with nearly 17 million applications for unemployment, nearly 500,000 confirmed cases, and 18,580 deaths in the US. It was a difficult week but negative emotions are dropping.

 


Recognition of the economic impact

Most are seeing the longer-term economic impact coming, but those living in urban centers are expecting a much shorter-term impact.


Erosion of Trust

Governments, which had an uptick last week likely due to increased economic relief, dropped this week. Health and medical organizations saw the largest drops in trust but overall remain the most trusted organizations tested.


Three Different Groups of Americans

We can divide Americans into 3 groups based on their response to the COVID-19 crisis: Hopeful Optimists are those who have been positive from the outset, even as more have seen the virus as a real threat (only 1 in 5 Americans); Concerned Realists are middle-of the road in their response (about half of Americans); Anxious Worriers are very negative (about one-third of Americans).

Hopeful Optimists, 20%

  • Tend to be older, male, higher educated, have kids, religious, either retired or Full-Time workers
  • Leading the expectation of a return to activities in the next two weeks
  • See the real threat, but may have unrealistic expectation for how long this will last

Concerned Realists, 48%

  • Spread across all emotions including a growing sense of anger
  • Tend to be younger, self-employed or not working, have no kids, or be Hispanic/Latino
  • Have a more realistic idea of how long this will last

Anxious Worriers, 32%

  • Extremely high numbers feeling all of the negative emotions we are tracking
  • Tend to be female, Millennials, Asians, students, or looking for work
  • Most expect negative impacts across life and many think it will last more than a year

These groups have very different expectations for personal and economic impact of COVID-19.

Anxious Worriers are focused on virus over economy, while Hopeful Optimists are split.


Data Source: Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions 4/8-9/2020 via an online survey. Access the full report here: Download PDF.  

Sample: n=1,001 US Adults 18+

Topics: We explored attitudes, feelings, and actions with respect to the COVID-19 crisis. This provides a quick look at the key storylines we uncovered by quickly digging into the data set.

 

COVID-19 Understanding the Human Story: Storylines From Our National Tracking Survey, Week 3

Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions April 1-2, 2020 via an online survey.

Access the full report here: Download PDF. Please contact us if you would like access to the crosstabs.


NOTE: Findings based on preliminary data.

Bringing us Closer Together

Nearly half of Americans believe that the outbreak is bringing us closer together which is up 4 points from last week.


Seeing Positive Impact on their Lives

People are settling in and seeing the positive impacts in a variety of aspects of their lives.  They are seeing improved relationships and time to focus on activities and physical health.


Expecting the Impact to Last Longer

Just under one-third of Americans believe the personal impact of COVID-19 will last  7 months or more. This is up 6 points from two weeks ago.


More Anxiety and Fear as COVID-19 Threat is Becoming More Real

It was a tough week as people face the real threat of COVID-19, its economic impact and what it might mean for their finances. The number of Americans who believe this is a real threat is up 5 points in the last week.


Protecting Public Health

Over half of Americans believe we need to continue to focus our energy on protecting public health.


CARES Act is giving hope, trust rebounding with government and local.

One-third of people believe the CARES Act will have a significant impact on Americans.

After hitting a low point last week, trust in Government, employers, our medical community, and social media is up significantly this week.


Consumers see the Good of Corporate America

Corporate America is getting good scores, and consumers see real things being done. The most positive reactions are to hearing what employers are doing to financially support employees, and to support social distancing measures, and to knowing what companies are doing to donate goods/services.


Data Source: Heart+Mind Strategies fielded a series of questions 4/1-2/2020 via an online survey. Access the full report here: Download PDF.  

Sample: n=1,000 US Adults 18+

Topics: We explored attitudes, feelings, and actions with respect to the COVID-19 crisis. This provides a quick look at the key storylines we uncovered by quickly digging into the data set.

 

Thoughts From Our Virtual Roundtable, 03.27

We push pause for one hour each week to talk, share, and listen to 60+ clients and partners who are participating in our Virtual Roundtable. As business leaders, employers, and human beings, this group discusses the impact of the latest COVID-19 developments, and ideas to help each other navigate the changing reality.

These are the topics discussed on March 27th. We hope these can help you and your teams as you make decisions moving ahead.


Advice on Tone and Approach to External Audience Messaging

Last week there were many questions regarding the best way to approach the tone and content for messaging to external stakeholder audiences. We shared the following advice for consideration moving ahead.

Demonstrate Leadership Principles

Leadership equities are particularly empowering to consider because they engender the confidence that the company or brand can continue to deliver the benefits that it promises to its stakeholders:

  • Be honest, authentic, and worthy of trust
  • Demonstrate care and compassion
  • Show your ability to get things done
  • Demonstrate innovation in solutions and service that make a difference
  • Be visionary, forward-thinking

Use Communications Story Arc

  • Recognize the seriousness of the situation without contributing to fears.
  • Express empathy and understanding for those being affected.
  • Express gratitude to those who are helping your organization serve others during this period, and, if appropriate, others making sacrifices and a difference (healthcare workers first responders, etc).
  • Highlight good works and actions demonstrating our shared humanity and lifting others.
  • Express hope.
  • Express commitment to the future.

Presence and Relevance

Continued presence of brand communications reinforces core stakeholders and prepares for future, post-virus recovery. Adjust media channels to correspond with changing landscape and emerging new habits of your stakeholders.  Refinement of existing visuals to align with social distancing. Importance of factual and helpful information customers need to know about any changes in how they acquire or request changes to existing products/services.

One size may not fit all – importance of understanding stakeholder and segment differences, emotions and decision-making.  For example, while a positive message that ‘we’re all in this together’ may resonate with those who are hopeful, determined and confident of recovery it may alienate others who are more skeptical, see more divisiveness, are confused or hurting economically and/or emotionally.

Demonstrating purpose and core values matter now more than ever.  Consumers are open to hearing from brands who are demonstrating how they are supporting employees, customers, and society.  How are you using your core competencies to help others?  To avoid appearing self-serving, brands who rely on employees (vs leaders), communities, and non-profit partners to tell their story of how they are helping are deemed more credible.

Societal Engagement

  • Retooling operations to make needed personal protection equipment (PPE) and devices (ventilators, respirators) or donation of existing PPE to those on the front lines
  • Free content on how to find a job and interview virtually
  • Access to faculty, best practices, and other online learning resources for people who are studying, teaching or working remotely
  • Donations and employee volunteerism to support food banks and feeding the hungry
  • Scientific communities and pharma industry teaming to advance testing and potential treatments
  • Alcohol industry making hand sanitizer
  • Grocery stores offering multitude of ways to obtain groceries, elderly hours, limiting # of customers at any given time, advanced sanitation continually, stocking of essential goods, hiring impacted workers from other industries
  • ‘Combat pay’ increases and bonuses for those on the front lines
  • Donation of rides and vehicles to support transportation
  • Free online conferencing platforms to enable family and work engagement
  • Financial institutions offering hardship policies to support those who can not meet financial obligations
  • Free online entertainment, movies, theatre, music and libraries/books.

What Will Stick Longer Term Post-COVID-19

We are working on developing a foundation for what we can all expect to be the fundamental shifts in consumer expectations and behaviors post COVID-19. This will be an ongoing focus for the coming weeks.

Early on these are the expectations of changes shared Friday, 3/30/20:

  1. Travel
  2. Workplace Changes
  3. Increased frugality/savings/preparedness focus
  4. Slowed Growth in Urban Centers/Reversal
  5. Rapid Growth of Online/Tech/AI Solutions
  6. Stronger Connections
  7. Focus on Hygiene
  8. Healthcare Changes
  9. Interaction With Other People
  10. More Cooking at Home
  11. Focus On Domesticity
  12. Massive Education Reform

How Quick to Get Back to Business – Your Thinking

Those participating also answered where they stand when it comes to the rapidly increasing debate over how long the lockdown can or should continue. Most are still on the side of expecting a longer lockdown. But, one in five are expecting we will be in early recovery mode by the end of next week.

The President is pushing a return by Easter. Medical experts are saying it’s not time. There are very different opinions on this and massively significant consequences for either direction. When you’re talking about it within your company, is your leadership thinking more toward get back to business or hunker down much longer?

  • 62% Hunker down longer
  •   6% Get back to business
  • 31% Honestly – can’t say we lean one way or the other – just don’t know

Do you think Americans are going to demand for back to business by Easter as the President is saying, or are they going to demand longer lockdown to control the spread?

  • 56% Demand longer lockdown
  •   0% Demand back to business
  • 43% It will be divided on both sides almost equally

By end of next week, do you expect your business to start shifting to early recovery mode OR do you expect to be still in heavy impact assessment mode?

  • 81% Heavy impact
  • 19% Early recovery

Priority Questions Ahead

We again asked for priority questions to focus on in the coming week. We use this input to guide us as we are gathering information to share in the next Virtual Roundtable. Please reach out if you have additional information and/or requests.

The prioritized list of question is as follows, ordered based upon the voting from the group:

  • 55% How to build trust (specifics even, with words to use)
  • 53% How to pace communications when to say what?
  • 50% How to avoid communication fatigue?
  • 46% Resuming operations in a post or flattened curve world
  • 42% How to differentiate messaging?
  • 39% Finding the right balance between hope and not minimizing the crisis
  • 39% What is the real impact of the stimulus package?
  • 32% Understanding a timeline that might hold
  • 28% Mental health challenges of our employees
  • 28% What is the impact on political races, the political climate?
  • 25% Dealing with financial losses at our businesses
  • 17% Long term motivation for remote workers
  • 10% How to talk to a broader stakeholder audience (beyond consumers)?

 

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